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Allan Ross
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Retired Married 1 2016-06-28 15:56:00
Warmest greetings to my fellow classmates!  As to what has happened in my life since 1966 --

After high school, I briefly attended the University of Maryland, then spent some time in the US Air Force as a crew chief and aircraft mechanic.  My last duty station was in Myrtle Beach, SC – not a bad assignment at the time – and I stayed in South Carolina and earned undergraduate and masters degrees in business and accounting from the University of South Carolina, and became a CPA in 1975.  While I am now retired, I worked for forty years in that field, spending thirteen years in public accounting with Arthur Andersen, Deloitte, and a local accounting practice; seventeen years in industry as a Controller with a Barclays Bank subsidiary and then as CFO of a small public finance company; and ten years with the IRS. 

While living in South Carolina, I met my wonderful wife, Sylvia, and we have been married since 1972.  We have lived in Charlotte, North Carolina since 1977, and have one daughter, Lauren, who is an attorney with Covington and Burling in Washington, DC. 

I still enjoy music, and have continued to sing, play the guitar and bass, and attempt to entertain anyone who will listen,  My current project is a show which I have put together singing and playing standards and “Sinatra type” songs.  It is actually (somewhat) in demand at the local retirement communities (well -- the target audience for Sinatra songs has aged a bit)……  But, in any event, I have fun doing it, and my “older groupies” seem to enjoy it as well.

It was wonderful seeing so many of you at our 50th reunion, and I look forward (perhaps a bit optimistically?) to our 75th!!
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G. Terry Ross
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2016-02-18 11:47:07
Wendy Ross
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2015-12-09 14:32:13
Robert Row
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2016-02-18 11:48:46
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Gary Rowland
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2015-12-09 14:32:55
Lisa Rubenstein (Orr)
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PAWLEYS ISLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT Married 1 2016-06-29 01:39:49
Greetings 
After a year at Wake Forest, a good ole southern baptist school where my last name didn't earn me many points, I transferred back to the University of MD, where I majored in English. I had the choice of going to work for relatives who owned Ringling Brothers Circus or doing Child Protective Services in Frederick County. I chose the latter and that led to lots of  coursework in counseling  at U of M and 30 years as a Juvenile Probation Officer. Twenty of those were in Montgomery County and ten in Georgetown County , SC where I moved in 1993, fulfilling my dream to live in Pawleys Island. 
After I figured out I only wanted to work with kids and had no desire to supervise, I ditched the Masters program. Needless to say I never got rich but had an incredibly rewarding career and have a storehouse of wild stories to tell. 
   After retiring in 2003, I went to work part-time as a Family Court Bailiff for four years. Those stories are far wilder than the ones I collected in the previous 30 years. I also got certified as a Police Officer Class III which in SC is for specific assignments. For the price of 4 weeks of legal training, and getting tased, I get to shoot guns and drive really fast a couple times a year. I left the Court in 2008 and walked into the entirely best job in the universe. I work as a seasonal police officer for the Town of Pawleys Island, where I am for some reason paid to ride an ATV on the beach and a Jet Ski when I feel like it. The stories from this job are the wildest yet. If I was any kind of writer at all. I'd have  published them and finally gotten rich! 
   I have one daughter. Sally, who is an RN. She also lives here in Pawleys. And I have one grandson, Adrian who is an avid surfer and artist. He splits his time between Pawleys and Charleston.
    I married my partner, Tracie in 2005, in Toronto. And then one morning not too long ago woke up one day to find us married in SC as well. Even the IRS says so, so it must be true. I know there are more than a few of you out there who were sure we'd never see it in our lifetimes!
    I am a bit creaky at times but healthy, and thankful. It feels like we've lost more than our share of classmates. Here's wishing you all well and if you are in Pawleys, the door is always open. 
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Donald Rubinstein
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don.rubinstein@gmail.com 2016-09-10 14:58:25
10 year old profile from the 40th reunion:    Bio. from: Donald Rubinstein   email   rubinste@uog9.uog.edu  The stream of WJ-66 bios have been fascinating to read. Current students at WJ should study them for life experience lessons for the next 40 years! They'll learn that (1) there is life after WJ; and (2) whatever happens will be unscripted and unpredictable but nevertheless rewarding, at least in retrospect. I would never have guessed in 1966 that today I would be living in Guam -- halfway around the planet from Bethesda -- and deeply immersed in a part of the world I had never heard of in high school.     Right after WJ I went to U. Penn with vague plans for taking pre-med courses and eventually going into medicine. After my freshman year I got a summer job in Bethesda at NIH, in what was then the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness. Great job, and one of those serendipitous life-changing junctures! The lab was involved in early forefront work on prion diseases (then called "slow viruses") in New Guinean highlanders, and epidemic ALS-PD in southern Guamanians, among other projects. The lab's chief scientist shared the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1976 for the prion work. I spent nearly every college vacation day I could manage, and sometimes weekends during the semester, working at that lab over the next three years. Meanwhile I was finding Penn intellectually exciting but socially unappealing -- too preppy and frat-house oriented -- although the place became a lot less buttoned-down after the 1968 sit-ins. The NIH summer job I had stimulated an interest in anthropology and especially Pacific Island cultures, an interest also fueled by my inherent wanderlust (escapism). Penn permitted me to piece together an interdisciplinary major involving anthro, developmental psych and linguistics, and some pre-med courses. I did an honors thesis on cross-cultural child language acquisition, and graduated cum laude in 1970.     After college I had no clear idea what I really wanted to do long-term with my life, but my immediate goal was to satisfy a growing itch to travel before continuing with graduate work. I spent 11 months hitch-hiking and solo backpacking around Europe, North Africa and the Middle east, from Reykjavik to Algiers and Tel Aviv to Granada, visiting just about every museum and historical site in every village or city I saw, and getting a look at most of the major sites of paleolithic cave art in Europe (including Lascaux, literally a once-in-a-lifetime experience). I was lured back to the States by the offer of a full-ride graduate fellowship at Stanford's doctoral program in anthropology. Grad study was even more intellectually exciting than undergrad work and really great fun as long as one treats it as an adventure and ignores the career-prep and competitive aspects. After the first year at Stanford I took off a year for further traveling, this time in the Pacific. Spent four months living on Fais, a very isolated tiny Pacific island of 250 people in the Outer Islands of Yap, Western Carolines (where I later returned for two years of dissertation field research on child socialization). That year I also worked as an assistant on a Scripps Institute medical research ship for two months that toured remote islands in Vanuatu (then the New Hebrides) and the Solomon Islands, and spent another couple of months living on Kapingamarangi, which like Easter Island is one of the most isolated Polynesian Islands in the Pacific.     Two days after completing my doctoral degree at Stanford in 1979 I began a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in medical anthropology at University of Hawaii, and that led to a nine-year sojourn in Honolulu, with many more trips throughout Micronesia. With NIMH funding I began a long-term study into the socio-cultural reasons for epidemic rates of suicide among Micronesian youth (work which, years later, got a nice plug from Malcolm Gladwell in "The Tipping Point"). Completed a Masters degree in Public Health at University of Hawaii, did some teaching, and a stint in academic administration, before leaving Hawaii in 1988 and moving to Guam to direct a small Micronesian area research center at the University of Guam. After three years in that job I moved into a position of full-time research and graduate teaching. Have been based in Guam ever since, for the most part quite enjoyably. One of the best aspects of a small, isolated school like University of Guam is that, although we have many first-rate faculty members, nobody takes themselves too seriously, unlike at powerhouse schools like Stanford or Penn. The academic calendar is another great advantage: a full month off between fall and spring semesters, and three months of free time in summer. I've been able to join friends for New Year celebrations in some extraordinary places, from Kyushu in southern Japan to Luxor on the middle Nile to Ubud in central Bali. University teaching is tremendously satisfying, the students in the program I teach are enthusiastic and truly grateful, and each class in a continual rediscovery. I've had opportunities to be visiting professor twice at the Institute of Ethnology in Heidelberg, and the Kagoshima University Research Center for the Pacific Islands (former colonial rulers Germany and Japan continue to take at least an academic interest in Micronesia). Because anthropology is so eclectic and Micronesian Studies so interdisciplinary, I can pursue all sorts of intellectual interests and research projects as part of "the job." So work is never boring. Or repetitive.      And I've quite happily remained single throughout my life. I have an extended "family" of about 300 Fais Islanders, a couple dozen of whom have lived in my house for a few years while attending high school or college or working in Guam, and I get back to Fais or neighboring islands Ulithi and Yap once or twice a year for family visits and research projects. University and community projects keep me fully engaged and the agenda is always diverse enough to provide a sense of adventure and novelty. Currently I'm on the board of the Guam Humanities Council and I'm serving as humanities scholar for a Smithsonian Museum-on-Main-Street exhibit coming to Guam in 2007, I'm doing a second year as president of the university's faculty senate, and I'm serving as a faculty mentor for a junior colleague who has a National Science Foundation Minority Research Fellowship. Plus teaching graduate classes, advising student theses, working on research projects, writing....     I have two siblings who live in Chevy Chase and Rockville, so I get back to the DC area about once a year, but I won't make the reunion this weekend.     I'm hoping to locate some long-lost high school friends through the reunion list. Send Donald a MessageSend Donald a Message
Ann Ruderman
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Veterans Administration 2015-12-09 14:34:20
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Diane Ruff
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2015-12-09 14:34:42
Susan Runnels (Wilton)
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2016-02-21 15:01:53
From the 40th reunion:
 
After graduation I attended the University of Maryland for one year and realized that college wasn't for me - I wasn't sure where I wanted to go or what I wanted to do so why waste my parent's money!!
 
I jumped into the employment world and finally ended up with a small business forms/printing company in 1972.  I have been with them for 35 years and in July a large national company bought us out.  They offered me a Senior Account Executive position and I am enjoying the challenge of learning all the new technology they have to offer my clients.
 
Also in 1972 I married Ralph Wilton (WJ class of '64) and we are still happily married.  Ralph is in sales for a local commercial awning company and has been in this field for years.  In 1978 our daughter Kelly was born and is still the delight of our lives.  She works for the Montgomery County government as the Director of the Emory Grove Family Resource Center .  We were happy to welcome Brian Keegan to our family in
June '05 when he and Kelly married.  Hopefully grandchildren won't be too far down the road!
 
Ralph and I are at the stage of our lives where we love to travel - so many places to see, so little time.  He will go anywhere I want as long as there is a golf course!! 
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